Scoring System for Big Events

Wednesday, 23 August 2017 20:02
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by Cesar Travado

(Photo courtesy of Matias Capizzano)

A new scoring system was used for the 2016 Europeans and the Worlds 2017. It consists, as most of you know, on a Qualifying Series and Final Series.

For the Final Series, each competitor carries his/her Overall position of the Qualifying Serie as Race #1 of the Final Series. This Race #1 is not excluded as discard.

When César Sans and I wrote the Sailing Instructions for the Europeans 2016, we spent a lot of time on the phone (and emails) discussing how to write them to be the most clear and understandable for competitors, specially in the point about the Fleets and Scoring System. We put special care on finding the exact words to not let space to doubts. No modifications to the Sailing Instructions during the Europeans, so I guess we made a good job.

...

 

Some controversy about this system and some claims about the fairness. So I took my time to compare with the Old System (11 races – 2 races excluded, orange colored) and the Add System (Some one propossed to carry the net points in the Qualifying Series as Race #1 instead of the Overall Position, Green colored). I added the average points per race column on each just for information.
The result is as follows (Points for calculating AVG are Nett Points):

 

 

PRUEBAS

FINAL

Net Points

AVG

OLD

Net Points

AVG

ADD

Net Points

AVG

Country

Skipper

PUR

Raúl Rios

1

36

6,0

1

52

5,8

1

52

8,7

ESP

Gustavo del Castillo

2

41

6,8

2

54

6,0

2

54

9,0

ESP

Rayco Tabares

3

42

7,0

3

60

6,7

3

60

10,0

ESP

Alfredo González

4

52

8,7

4

67

7,4

6

74

12,3

BRA

Mario Tinoco

5

56

9,3

6

70

7,8

4

70

11,7

BRA

Alexandre Tinoco

6

57

9,5

8

76

8,4

7

76

12,7

ESP

Álvaro Martínez

7

59

9,8

5

68

7,6

5

72

12,0

ESP

Raúl de Valenzuela

8

62

10,3

9

79

8,8

9

79

13,2

BRA

Bruno Bethlem

9

64

10,7

10

81

9,0

10

81

13,5

ESP

Damián Borrás

10

70

11,7

7

75

8,3

8

77

12,8

BRA

Alexandre Paradeda

11

73

12,2

11

90

10,0

11

90

15,0

USA

Ernesto Rodríguez

12

75

12,5

12

92

10,2

12

92

15,3

BRA

Rafael Gagliotti

13

75

12,5

13

92

10,2

13

92

15,3

POR

Mafalda Pires

14

77

12,8

14

95

10,6

14

95

15,8

BRA

Juliana Duque

15

88

14,7

17

106

11,8

15

106

17,7

BRA

Breno Bianchi

16

95

15,8

20

114

12,7

17

114

19,0

JPN

Tetsuo Watanabe

17

97

16,2

16

105

11,7

16

113

18,8

ESP

José María Guerrero

18

98

16,3

15

101

11,2

18

115

19,2

BRA

Tiago Brito

19

102

17,0

21

120

13,3

19

120

20,0

BRA

Mario Sergio de Jesús

20

103

17,2

18

106

11,8

20

121

20,2

USA

Augie Díaz

21

107

17,8

19

112

12,4

21

124

20,7

ESP

Jordi Triay

22

117

19,5

22

124

13,8

22

133

22,2

BRA

Gabriel Kieling

23

130

21,7

24

133

14,8

23

149

24,8

JPN

Yuichi Ohi

24

136

22,7

26

152

16,9

24

154

25,7

JPN

Junichiro Shiraish

25

136

22,7

23

131

14,6

25

155

25,8

USA

Doug Hart

26

142

23,7

27

155

17,2

26

160

26,7

BRA

Leonardo Lombardi

27

147

24,5

25

150

16,7

28

168

28,0

ESP

Marcos Míguez

28

148

24,7

28

155

17,2

27

165

27,5

JPN

Yuta Kunimi

29

148

24,7

31

170

18,9

29

170

28,3

JPN

Koji Kamiya

30

154

25,7

30

165

18,3

30

173

28,8

USA

Randy Lake

31

155

25,8

33

174

19,3

32

178

29,7

BRA

Mateus Tavares

32

155

25,8

29

160

17,8

31

177

29,5

BRA

Luis Soubie

33

157

26,2

32

172

19,1

33

184

30,7

BRA

Adriano Santos

34

168

28,0

34

186

20,7

34

196

32,7

NOR

Nicholas Pelicano Grael

35

174

29,0

35

193

21,4

35

196

32,7

I took the top 35 from Final Series and compare the Final Position depending on the Scoring System used. As we can see, no changes on the Top 4 between the Old and the New Systems.

From the table, we can draw some conclusions:

a)     The Scoring System used (any one of them) does not affect extremely the Final Results. Minor changes of 1 or 2 positions, but no dramatic changes.

b)     The New Scoring System does not require the best average points to be World Champion what it means that the top 35 in the Qualifying Series has a chance to win. Raúl Ríos would win the Championsip in any case but using the Old System, an average of 5,8 points in each race could be enough to be World Champion.

I think the New Scoring System (when using Blue and Yellow fleets) is really good because nobody can say who will win until the last race is finished. All of us have seen regattas where the winner is known before the last race or even in the last two races. With this system, emotion and uncertainty keep the regatta alive, adding that, if you want to win, you have to reduce your average positions and to be the very best.

On the other hand, compressing the fleet after the Qualifying Series by carrying the Overal Position only, opens the door to more competitors that may be the winner during the Finals. For instance, Rayco Tabares coming from 15th in Qualifying to 3rd or Alfredo Gonzalez coming from 30th to 4th. So we can assure that, even when you do not get a good position in Qualifying, the regatta is not over for you, what, again, is good for the entire fleet.

I like the Blue System (Worlds and European 2016) because it compresses the fleet. Maybe competitors do not see their effort in the first 5 races in the points (only 1 point between positions) but this is an opinion from the top 10. I think it is good to conserve your options to win until at least the middle of the regatta.

Don´t you think that 30 boats conserving their options to win after the first 6 races is good for the competition? It estimulates competitors and grows emotions.

Raúl Ríos and Marc Agnese deserved to be, regardless on the Scoring System, and they are, the fairest World Champions.

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Cesar Travado

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