Old Man’s Tips when Capsizing

[caption id="attachment_7928" align="alignnone" width=""]John Payne PhotographyGonzalo [/caption]

ATTENTION SNIPE SAILORS!

(From the SCIRA archives)

IMPORTANT SAFETY TIPS FOR NEW SNIPE SAILORS

by Gonzalo “Old Man” Diaz

1. Do not go out in the Snipe unless it is blowing less than 15 mph. To venture out in higher winds, please, wait until you have a year of experience under your belt and an experienced crew.

2. Be sure to tie in your board with the safety rope every time you go out! The rope has to be doing the job before you sail away from the dock. And make sure that the rope is adjusted so that the board will not come out of the centerboard trunk when lifted and tilted (forward and aft).

To read the rest of The Old Man’s tips, download the attached PDF.

John Payne Photography

ATTENTION SNIPE SAILORS!

(From the SCIRA archives)

IMPORTANT SAFETY TIPS FOR NEW SNIPE SAILORS

by Gonzalo “Old Man” Diaz

1. Do not go out in the Snipe unless it is blowing less than 15 mph. To venture out in higher winds, please, wait until you have a year of experience under your belt and an experienced crew.

2. Be sure to tie in your board with the safety rope every time you go out! The rope has to be doing the job before you sail away from the dock. And make sure that the rope is adjusted so that the board will not come out of the centerboard trunk when lifted and tilted (forward and aft).

To read the rest of The Old Man’s tips, download the attached PDF.

 

donq062Additional updates:

The McLaughlins, Chubascos, Phoenix and Eclipse boats will not be stable after a capsize and will tend to roll over again. The reason is that they take a lot of water in the cockpit and they do not have enough air tanks. So, when bringing them up is important to keep one sailor in the water to hang on to the deck and try to stop the boat from rolling over again. But those boats are easier to get on the centerboard as they do not sit so high on their sides when capsized.

The Perssons and Jibetechs have less tendency to roll over, so they can be brought up without having to keep someone in the water. However, it is important to jump on the centerboard in the process of flipping because it is very difficult to climb up onto the board once they are capsized. The board is very high out of the water.

Since my instructions are for capsizing in shallow waters, maybe you should get a volunteer to write what has to be done in deep waters when the boat goes upside down. Needless to say it is even more important to have the centerboard tied down with a safety line!

SNIPE_TIPS_WHEN_CAPSIZING_IN_BISCAYNE_BAY-1.pdf

2 thoughts on “Old Man’s Tips when Capsizing

  1. Otra ayuda para adrizar el barco es que el tripulante (si es mas liviano) se abrace al stay de proa y al puño de amura del Foque, así cuando el barco comience a enderezarse se pondrá al viento usando al tripulante como “ancla de mar” e inmediatamente se endereza el barco, el tripulante “corre” prontamente a la banda opuesta al timonel y apoya sus pies bajo el agua sobre la orza, a fin de estabilizar el barco y evitar que tumbe hacia la otra banda.
    Aprovecho la oportunidad de agradecer todos los aportes que Gonzalo”Old Man” Díaz ha realizado a la clase Snipe

  2. I read Mr. Diaz’s article last week, and promptly capsized my McGo for the first time, the following Sunday in 15k breeze. She turtled and the mast dug into the muddy bottom. I was very glad I had read the article. She was tough to right, and flipped one time after getting her upright, but eventually…broadside to the wind, I got her mast unstuck and upright. Very timely article for us frostbiters Thanks Carol and thanks Mr. Diaz.

    Peter Devlin Fleet 554 Beverly, MA

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