Sailing Checklist

[caption id="attachment_4677" align="alignnone" width=""]Fried ElliotDon Q 2006[/caption]

A little history on the list:

Since 1980, I’ve taken numerous chunks of years off of sailing at various times, making it harder and harder for me when I come back to remember what my crew and I are supposed to focus on around the race course. Connie and I first adapted the checklist to the Snipe in 1989. Our list built on a list my E-Scow teammate, Terry Kempton, and I first put together in 1978, when this 28 foot surfboard was throwing too many new things at us too fast during the races, and we couldn’t keep up without a memorized outline. The list has been through a number of permutations over the years (e.g., dropping out things like on the E-Scow: responsibility for leeboards, backstays, best times to use the big chute or little; and on the Snipe: whisker pole technique prior to pole launchers). Recently, since my daughters brought me out of retirement in 2002, daughter Morgan has tweeked the list a lot, and now Sheehan has added her own twists. This past Winter Circuit, we added a new technique learned from Gavin McKinney, Jimmy Lowe’s teammate, for setting the pole on a heavy air reach.

Fried Elliot

A little history on the list:

Since 1980, I’ve taken numerous chunks of years off of sailing at various times, making it harder and harder for me when I come back to remember what my crew and I are supposed to focus on around the race course. Connie and I first adapted the checklist to the Snipe in 1989. Our list built on a list my E-Scow teammate, Terry Kempton, and I first put together in 1978, when this 28 foot surfboard was throwing too many new things at us too fast during the races, and we couldn’t keep up without a memorized outline. The list has been through a number of permutations over the years (e.g., dropping out things like on the E-Scow: responsibility for leeboards, backstays, best times to use the big chute or little; and on the Snipe: whisker pole technique prior to pole launchers). Recently, since my daughters brought me out of retirement in 2002, daughter Morgan has tweeked the list a lot, and now Sheehan has added her own twists. This past Winter Circuit, we added a new technique learned from Gavin McKinney, Jimmy Lowe’s teammate, for setting the pole on a heavy air reach.

Revised: April 28, 2006

ON SITE REGATTA PREPARATION AND SAILING SMART

 

PRE-RACE

 

S & C  –           Hourly wind readings during days before racing begins

 

S          –           Get a buddy

 

S          –           Get weather and tide reports each day and superimpose on site chart

 

S & C  –           Stretch

 

S & C  –           Eat and drink right

 

S & C  –           Pack water, Powerade, Red Bull (something with caffeine, but not too much – dehydration!), carbohydrates of some sort, Sustagen or equivalent, bananas and power bars for boat and coach boat

 

S & C  –           Tape jib halyard hook and top shackle

 

S & C  –           Check ditty bag for boat

 

S & C  –           Check extra tape on tiller

 

S & C  –           Check rigging overall

 

S & C  –           Check rake and mast side to side

 

S&C –              Spare jib, coach boat ditty bag and non-boat food & liquids in coach boat

 

 

ON WATER BEFORE 5 MINUTE GUN

 

S & C  –           Check in with race committee

 

S & C  –           Check the line and weather leg with buddy

 

S & C  –           Do a 2 minute practice start

 

S & C  –           Practice acceleration and rock and pump before start

 

S & C  –           Check vang setting for reach

 

S & C  –           Check vang setting for upwind

 

C         –           Check pole line at front and back and on deck to see if clear

 

S & C  –           Set jib leads for conditions

 

S          –           When checking start line in light air, get better wind readings at ends of line

 

S & C  –           Check for current (Study RC boat at anchor – consider how current will affect start)

 

S & C  –           Get compass readings for both tacks and establish highs & lows (SHoot & PLow)

 

C         –           Even up control lines

 

S & C  –           Estimate compass reading from weather mark to reaching mark and jibe to leeward mark and check out wave angles for reaches

 

S & C  –           Check current on jibe mark

 

S & C  –           Check jib set for conditions

 

C         –           Ask skipper, “What’s the plan upwind and for start?”

 

 

AFTER 5 MINUTE GUN

 

S & C –           Check course (Offset? Gate?)

 

S & C  –           Check the line and take wind readings

 

S          –           Check vang setting for upwind

 

S & C  –           Stand up and look for wind at 3 minutes, 2 minutes and 1 minute

 

S & C  –           Weed at 2 minutes

 

S          –           In light air, because the wind tends to lift up over the fleet, consider starting at left or right side of start; if on right, consider tacking early. In light air, avoid tacking back into fleet at start.

 

S          –           Approach fleet on port at 1 minute 30 seconds to find a turkey and tack onto starboard at 45 to 30 seconds above turkey. Stay away from ends (use 2/5 rule)! Put on vang to preset mark when tack onto starboard. Don’t be up on line early, because Committee will take note.

 

S          –           In light air, turn off ratchets for start, so boats around you can’t hear you trim in.

 

C         –           Read out time (but not so loud that others can hear). At least 15 seconds, concentrate on where skipper wants to go and use body and trim to get there.

 

S          –           Trim and go at the time that, or before, the next boat trims

 

S & C  –           Body English at start, but not too much with flat plate board

 

 

AFTER START

 

S & C  –           Go flat out all out fast for 2 minutes

 

S          –           Get separation – do not tack more than twice in first 5 min. – want to cruise through middle at ½ way up beat. If have to tack, don’t tack until can see way clear. Look for blockers on starboard and port.

 

S & C  –           Watch the locals

 

S & C  –           Keep it flat

 

S & C  –           Roll back in waves

 

C         –           After each tack is completed, take in slack on windward jib sheets and coil windward sheet and make sure leeward one can run free

 

S & C  –           Check angle of fleet – take it. Crew to feed skipper angles and relative speed!

 

S & C  –           Look for starboard tackers. Very important for crew!

 

C         –           Check angle of aft deck on horizon – Think Balance

 

C         –           Remind skipper to get head out of boat

 

S & C  –           Watch for wind on water. Crew to inform skipper.

 

S & C  –           Read compass but sailing fleet is more important. Crew to read compass to skipper.

 

S          –           Interpret wind on water

 

C         –           Feed skipper info on competitors to leeward and ahead and to windward (speed and angles)

 

S          –           Anticipate crossing situations early and have plan.

 

S          –           No luff wrinkles above spreader

 

S          –           Because of inefficient blades, do not let boat change heeling angles much

 

 

BEFORE WEATHER MARK

 

S          –           Rounding on a lift or a header?

 

C         –           Look for next mark

 

S          –           Don’t get lazy – look for shifts at end, and don’t get to layline too early

 

S          –           Tell crew whether pole reach or not; trim through leads or hand hold

 

S          –           Tell crew where she will be sitting on reach

 

C         –           Ask skipper, “What’s the plan?”

 

S          –           Explain mark rounding tactics if rounding in traffic

 

S          –           On second windward leg, can come in with smooth water on port layline, unless behind on a double triangle

 

 

ROUNDING WEATHER MARK

 

S          –           Rounding in lift or header? Go high or low

 

S          –           When rounding in traffic, slow & win

 

S & C  –           When in traffic, do not set pole immediately

 

S          –           When in doubt, do not set pole. If set pole, set at full length. It’s dangerous to be the first to set pole

 

C         –           If don’t set pole, hand hold jib or go to jib lead reach settings.

 

S          –           When set pole, head downwind. If heavy air, crew should physically hold pole with one hand and make the first big, long pull with the other, so that the jib clew butts up to the pole end first.

 

C         –           After set pole, help skipper pull back and put sheet in reaching hook

 

S          –           Ease vang to pre-set mark

 

C         –           Ease jib cunningham

 

C         –           Pull up board – last thing because need maneuverability

 

S          –           Ease main cunningham

 

S          –           Ease jib halyard (1″ if no pole; about 6″ if with pole and reaching [the more you need to point, the less you let it off]; all the way off if running [at least 18 inches, unless very light air])

 

S          –           Check current at mark

 

C         –           Coil lines

 

S          –           Pull in pole jib sheet

 

C         –           Ease outhaul, especially for shelf foot sails

 

 

FIRST REACH

 

S & C  –           Keep track of wind shifts for next weather leg (easing and trimming)

 

S & C  –           Look over shoulder for wind, boats and waves (crew to remind skipper)

 

S          –           Up in lulls; off in puffs – communicate to crew

 

S          –           Play jib halyard (light air) and vang in puffs and lulls

 

C         –           Coil lines

 

S          –           Don’t over-vang; check top batten; should be parallel

 

C         –           If hand held jib; must keep frisbee shape and draw evenly

 

S & C  –           Steer with weight

S          –           Keep mast as straight as possible

 

C         –           Pole back as come down on waves; don’t uncleat; skipper or crew just grabs line directly from pole and pulls; at the bottom of wave, lit it go for coming back up

 

S          –           On a “meat reach” (tight reach in heavy air), don’t put too much power in main, don’t pull board up too far and don’t move too far aft. Hike hard! Balance this rule with, generally, in heavy air reach want to err on side of being too far back, so boat is in control and you’re not fighting the tiller to pull boat off in puff. On heavy air reaches always hike at 45 degrees back; more effective.

 

 

 

BEFORE JIBE MARK

 

C         –           Look for next mark

 

S          –           Pole on next reach? What about beginning of reach?

 

S & C  –           Communicate on tactics (will you need no pole and more board to get up over boats around you after the jibe?) Pole or not?

 

C         –           Pole out of reach hook or jib lead back to normal

 

C         –           Ask skipper, “What’s the plan?”

 

S & C  –           If rounding in crowd, plan on not setting pole immediately and have board lower for maneuverability

 

S          –           Don’t forget pole overlapping rudder for buoy room. If inside, give it up; if outside, don’t give it unless facts established and acknowledged earlier on.

 

 

JIBE

 

C         –           Shorten pole and pull up jib halyard

 

C         –           Drop board to next reach position – a little lower for maneuverability

 

C         –           Take pole down. Don’t forget to pull on windward jib sheet as uncleat pole – very important!

 

S          –           Overtrim main to 45 degrees

 

C         –           Roll: sit down hard on windward side and pull vang over or stay on leeward side and lean over top of board

 

C         –           When boom crosses above board pull pole back up and then help skipper pull back and put sheet in reaching hook

 

S          –           Pull in windward jib sheet after jibe

 

S          –           If pole comes in too slowly and gets stuck on forestay, if tactics allow, jibe back and pull pole back out.

 

C         –           If don’t set pole, hand hold jib or go to jib lead reach settings.

 

S          –           Check current at mark (upwind tactics)

 

 

BEFORE BOTTOM MARK

 

S & C  –           Think if rounding in lift or header

 

S          –           Look at boats on upwind leg or back of reaching leg

 

S          –           Plan weather leg

 

S & C  –           Look for wind upwind

 

C         –           Look for next mark

 

S          –           Talk about rounding tactics

 

C         –           If pole up, take out of reaching hook; if no pole, jib lead back to normal

 

S & C  –           Bring mast back to upwind setting

 

                                               Before…

 

S & C  –           Shorten pole and pull up halyard

 

C         –           Put on jib cunningham

 

S          –           Put on main cunningham

 

C         –           Ask skipper, “What’s the plan; have you thought about next weather leg?”

 

 

 

 

ROUNDING LEEWARD MARK

 

S          –           Check current at mark

 

S & C  –           Steer by weight around mark

 

C         –           Drop board and then pole as round

 

S          –           Pull in weather line at same time pole is dropped

 

C         –           Snap jib out of pole and trim jib but do not trim too fast (no tighter than heading of the boat warrants)

 

S          –           When rounding in traffic, slow and win

 

S          –           Get on the lifted tack. Get separation early by staying with the plan.

 

C         –           After rounding, check pole line at front and end of boom and at deck, and check jib leads on both sides.

 

 

DOWNWIND

 

S & C  –           Don’t forget offset!

 

C         –           Stay forward, unless planing

 

C         –           Short pole (sometimes in light air) or full length pole?

 

S          –           Up in lulls and off in puffs; play jib halyard (from off 6″ to off 18″) and vang

 

C         –           Ask skipper, “What’s the plan for the beat?”

 

S          –           Pole back as come down on wave

 

S          –           Don’t over vang; top batten should be twisted off

 

 

S          –           Choose gate that fits plan

 

LAST BEAT

 

S          –           Get lifted tack; get separation early by staying with the plan

 

S & C  –           Look for favored end of finish (NEVER finish in middle of line; always cross at right angles)

 

 

STEERING THE BOAT BY MEANS OTHER THAN THE TILLER

 

            Body Weight

 

                       Move forward – boat heads up

                       Move aft – boat heads off

 

                       Torque forward – boat heads down

                       Torque aft – boat heads up

 

                       Lean out – boat heads off

                       Lean in – boats heads up

 

 

            Sheet Tension

 

                       Trim main – boat heads up

                       Ease main – boat heads off

 

                       Trim jib – boat heads down

                       Ease jib – boat heads up

 

 

            Centerboard

 

                        Up – boat heads off    

                       Down – boat heads up

da snipe.it, maggio 2006 (Pietro Fantoni)

Peter Commette, smentendo l’affermazione che non avrebbe più scritto, ci ha inviato un nuovo articolo. Si tratta della sua personale checklist, mai pubblicata prima, che uscirà sulla Snipenewsletter americana. Molti spunti interessanti. Stampatela e leggetela con calma. Buona lettura. (foto courtesy of Fried Elliot, http://www.friedbits.com/PhotoBits/Sailing/Snipe/index.php)

di Peter Commette

Avevo mentito. Una volta ogni tanto esco con un nuovo articolo, anche se questo è un nuovo articolo di vecchie informazioni.

Ho utilizzato la checklist per anni alle clinics che ho tenuto, ma penso che non sia mai stata pubblicata prima.

Una breve storia sulla lista.

A partire dal 1980 ho passato tanti anni e lunghi periodi lontano dalla vela, rendendo particolarmente difficile per me, quando ritornavo a regatare, ricordare su che cosa io e il mio prodiere dovevamo focalizzare l’attenzione lungo i percorsi di regata. Io e Connie abbiamo adottato la checklist per lo Snipe a partire dal 1989. La nostra lista era stata creata utilizzando quella che io e il mio compagno di equipaggio sugli E-Scow Terry Kempton avevamo messo insieme nel 1978, quando questa tavola da surf di 28 piedi ci rovesciava addosso, durante le regate, tante nuove cose e tanto velocemente, che noi non saremmo potuti venirne a capo senza una scaletta memorizzata. Questa lista è passata attraverso un numero notevole di cambiamenti nel corso degli anni (ad esempio eliminando cose valide per gli E-Scow: responsabilità per la deriva, volanti, utilizzo dello spi grande o piccolo; o cose che erano valide per lo Snipe: la tecnica nell’usare il tangone prima che fosse utilizzato il sistema attuale con lo sparatangone). Di recente, dopo che le mie figlie mi hanno fatto uscire dal ritiro nel 2002, mia figlia Morgan ha ampliato di molto la lista e ora Sheehan ha aggiunto il proprio contributo. Durante l’ultimo Winter Circuit, abbiamo inserito una nuova tecnica imparata da Gavin McKinney, il prodiere di Jimmy Lowe, per dare tangone con vento forte al lasco.


Lista per prepararsi alla regata e per regatare bene

Pre – regata
Timoniere & Prodiere  –  Letture ogni ora della bussola nei giorni precedenti la regata
T – Trova un amico su un’altra barca assieme alla quale uscire
T – Procurati le previsioni del tempo e delle maree e sovrapponile alla carta del luogo
T & P – Fare stretching
T & P – Mangia e bevi correttamente
T & P – Porta l’acqua in barca e sulla barca appoggio, Powerade, Red Bull (qualcosa con caffeina, ma non esagerare: disidratazione!), carboidrati di qualsiasi tipo, Sustagen o equivalenti, banane, power bars
T & P – Nastra la coppiglia e il gambetto della ghinda del fiocco
T & P – Controlla la (“ditty bag”) borsetta impermeabile dei gambetti, coppiglie ecc. di rispetto da portare in barca
T & P – Controlla il nastro adesivo extra arrotolato attorno alla barra del timone
T & P – Controlla l’attrezzatura in generale
T & P – Controlla il rake e la posizione laterale dell’albero
T & P – Sulla barca appoggio il fiocco di riserva, la ditty bag che va sul gommone, il cibo e le bevande che non porti in barca

In acqua prima dei 5 minuti
T & P – Check in alla Barca Comitato
T & P – Controlla con l’amico la linea di partenza e il lato di bolina
T & P – Fai una partenza di prova sui 2 minuti
T & P – Prova l’accelerazione e il modo di fare accellerare la barca prima della partenza
T & P – Controlla la regolazione del vang per il lasco
T & P – Controlla la regolazione del vang per la bolina
P – Controlla che non abbia groppi la cima dello sparatangone, avanti, dietro e sulla coperta
T & P – Regola i carrelli del fiocco per le condizioni del momento
T – Con aria leggera, controlla con accuratezza la direzione del vento agli estremi della linea
T & P – Controlla la corrente (studia la Barca Comitato all’ancora, considera in che modo la corrente influenzerà la partenza)
T & P – Prendi i gradi bussola su ogni bordo e stabilisci i massimi e i minimi
P – Pareggia su ogni lato le cime per le regolazioni
T & P – Prendi i gradi bussola per la boa di bolina, del primo lasco, del secondo lasco, della poppa e controlla l’angolazione delle onde per i laschi
T & P – Controlla la corrente sulla boa di strambata
T & P – Controlla la regolazione del fiocco per le condizioni
P – Chiedi al timoniere: “Qual è il piano per la bolina e per la partenza?”

Dopo il segnale dei 5 minuti
T & P – Controlla il percorso (Offset alla boa di bolina? Gate di poppa?)
T & P – Controlla la linea e prendi i gradi della direzione del vento
T – Controlla la regolazione del vang per la bolina
T & P – Alzati e guarda il vento ai 3, 2 e 1 minuto
T & P – Alghe ai 2 minuti
T – Con vento leggero, poiché il vento tende ad alzarsi sopra la flotta, considerara di partire a sinistra o a destra; se a destra, considera di virare subito. Con aria leggera, evita di virare di nuovo verso la flotta alla partenza
T – Avvicina la flotta mure a sinistra a 1 minuto e 30 secondi e trova un pivellino (“turkey”) e vira sotto di lui mure a dritta ai 45 – 30 secondi. Tieniti lontano dagli estremi (usa la regola dei 2/5)! Metti il vang sul segno prestabilito quando viri mure a dritta. Non uscire troppo presto perché il Comitato prenderà nota!
T – Con aria leggera disattiva il cricco dal bozzello, così le barche vicino non sentono quando cazzi.
P – Scandisci il tempo (ma non tanto forte che gli altri possano sentire). Negli ultimi 15 secondi concentrati su dove il timoniere vuole andare e usa il corpo e la scotta per farlo
T – Cazza e parti nel momento in cui, o prima, che la barca vicino lo fa.
T & P – Usa, in modo legale, i movimenti del corpo, ma non esagerare con una deriva così piatta.

Dopo la partenza
T & P – Vai piatto e veloce per 2 minuti
T – Fai separazione – non virare più di due volte nei primi 5 minuti. Se devi virare, non virare finche non vedi  una corsia di aria pulita. Guarda le barche che fanno da blocco (“blockers) mure a dritta e sinistra.
T & P – Guarda i locali
T & P – Tienila piatta
T & P – Piegati indietro nelle onde
P – Dopo che ogni virata è completata, tieni allentata la scotta sopravento, tienila in chiaro e fa attenzione che la scotta sottovento sia libera di scorrere
T & P – Controlla l’angolo della flotta. Il prodiere nutre il timoniere di angoli e relative velocità!
T & P – Guarda le barche mure a dritta. Molto importante per il prodiere!
P – Controlla l’angolo della coperta a poppa rispetto all’orizzonte – Pensa a tenere la barca piatta
P – Ricorda allo skipper di tenere la testa fuori dalla barca
T & P  – Osserva il vento sull’acqua. Il prodiere informa il timoniere
T & P – Legge la bussola ma la flotta che naviga è più importante. Il prodiere legge la bussola al timoniere
T – Interpreta il vento sull’acqua
P – Comunica al timoniere informazioni sugli avversari sottovento e davanti e sopravento (velocità è angoli)
T – Anticipa le situazioni di incrocio in anticipo e sviluppa un piano
T – No pieghette sull’inferitura sopra le corcette
T – A causa dei profili inefficienti, non cambiare molto inclinazione della barca

Prima della boa di bolina
T – Girare la boa su un buono o su uno scarso?
P – Guarda la prossima boa
T – Non diventare pigro – controlla i salti di vento e non prendere la layline troppo presto
T – Comunica al prodiere se è un lasco con tangone oppure no; se il fiocco va cazzato dal carrello oppure tenuto esterno
T – Comunica al prodiere dove si siederà al lasco
P – Chiede al timoniere: “Qual è il piano?”
T – Spiega la tattica per girare la boa se c’è traffico
T – Sul secondo lato di bolina, può arrivare sulla layline di sinistra, a meno che si tratti di un doppio triangolo

Alla boa di bolina
T – Si gira su un buono o uno scarso? Vai alto o basso
T – Quando c’è traffico, “slow & win”
T & P – Quando c’è traffico, non dare il tangone immediatamente
T – Se in dubbio, non dare il tangone. Se dai il tangone, regolalo in modo che sia tutto fuori. E’ pericoloso essere i primi a dare il tangone
P – Se non dai il tangone, tieni la scotta del fiocco in mano o metti il punto scotta per il lasco
T – Quando da il tangone, poggia in poppa. Se c’è vento forte, il prrodiere dovrebbe tenere il tangone con una mano e dare la prima grande tirata con l’altra sullo sparatangone, cosicché il punto di scotta del fiocco va a sbattere subito contro la punta (varea) del tangone.
P – Dopo che il tangone è uscito, aiuta il timoniere a tirarlo indietro (quadrarlo) e a mettere la scotta nel gancio per il lasco (o a cazzare il barber)
T – Lasca il vang (o il prodiere se la regolazione è avanti)
P – Lasca il cunningham del fiocco
P – Alza la deriva – ultima cosa poiché è necessaria la manovrabilità
T – Lasca il cunningham della randa
T – Lasca la ghinda (2,5 cm senza tangone; circa 15 cm se è un lasco con tangone [più cazzato se devi orzare, meno se devi poggiare]; in ogni caso tutto lasco [almeno 45 cm, a meno che non ci sia vento molto leggero])
T – Controlla la corrente alla boa
P – Controlla le cime che non siano annodate
T – Cazza la scotta del fiocco col tangone
P – Lasca la base

Primo lasco
T & P – Segui i salti di vento per il prossimo lato di bolina (lascando e cazzando)
T & P – Guardati alle spalle per il vento, le barche e le onde (il prodiere deve ricordarlo al timoniere)
T – Su nelle mollane; giù nelle raffiche – comunicare al prodiere
T – Regola la ghinda (con aria leggera) e il vang nelle raffiche e nelle mollane
P – Mette in chiaro le cime
T – Non cazza troppo il vang; controlla la stecca alta; deve essere parallela
P  – Se tiene il fiocco con la mano (senza tangone), deve mantenere una forma frisbee e trattenuto uniformemente
T & P – Timona con il peso
T – Tiene l’albero il più dritto possibile
P – Cazza il tangone indietro quando si scende da un’onda; non toglie dallo strozzatore la scotta; il timoniere o il prodiere afferrano la scotta direttamente dal tangone e cazzano; nel cavo dell’onda, molla per risalire su
T – Al lasco con vento forte non mettere troppa potenza nella randa, non tirare troppo su la deriva e non spostarti troppo indietro. Cinghia forte! Bilancia questa regola con: generalmente nei laschi con vento forte desideri sbagliare quando stai seduto troppo indietro cosicché la barca è in controllo e non lotti con la barra per  poggiare nelle raffiche. Nei laschi con vento forte cinghia sempre  a 55 gradi verso poppa; più efficace

Prima della boa di strambata
P – Guarda dov’è la prossima boa
T – Tangone al prossimo lasco? Che fare all’inizio del lasco
T & P – Comunica la tattica (avrai bisogno di non avere il tangone e più deriva per alzarti sopra le barche attorno dopo la strambata?) Tangone o no?
P – Tangone fuori o fiocco normale nel carrello
P – Chiede al timoniere “Qual è il piano?”
T – No dimenticare che il tangone determina l’ingaggiamento con il timone per avere acqua in boa. Se sei interno rinuncia a darlo; se esterno, non darlo se non per ragioni particolari stabilite e conosciute prima

Strambata
P – Accorcia il  tangone e tira la ghinda del fiocco
P – Sistema la deriva nella posizione richeiesta dal prossimo lasco
P – Fa rientrare il tangone. Non dimenticare di cazzare la scotta sopravento del fiocco quando rilasci lo sparatangone – molto importante!
T – Cazza la randa più del dovuto (“overtrim”) a 45 gradi
P – Rollio: siediti bene sul lato sopravento e tira il vang o stai sottovento e appoggiati alla parte superiore della deriva
P – Quando passa il boma sopra la deriva tira il tangone di nuovo fuori e poi aiuta il timoniere a cazzare la scotta e a metterla nel gancio per il lasco (o a cazzare il barber)
T – Cazza la scotta del fiocco dopo la strambata
T – Se il tangone rientra troppo lentamente e si incastra nello strallo, se la tattica lo consente, ristramba di nuovo e ritira fuori il tangone
P – Se non si deve dare il tangone, tieni il fiocco in mano o con il punto scotta per i laschi
T – Controlla la corrente alla boa (tattica per la bolina)

Prima della boa sottovento
T & P – Pensa se stai giurando la boa in un buono o in uno scarso
T – Guarda le barche di bolina o indietro nel lato di lasco
T – Pianifica il lato di bolina
T & P – Guarda sopravento il vento
P – Guarda la prossima boa
T – Parla riguardo alla tattica nel girare la boa
P – Se il tangone è furoi, tira fuori la scotta dal gandi per il lasco (o lasca il barber); se non c’è il tangone, rimetti il punto scotta nella posizione normale
T & P – Riporta l’albero nella posizione di bolina
   Prima…
T & P – Accorcia il tangone e tira la ghinda
P – Tira il cunningham del fiocco
T – Tira il cunningham della randa
P – Chiede al timoniere “Qual è il piano? Hai pensato al prossimo lato?”

Alla boa sottovento
T – Controlla la corrente all boa
T & P – Timona con il peso nel giro di boa
P – Tira già la deriva e poi fa rientrare il tangone mentre gira
T – Tira la scotta sopravento nello stesso istante che rientra il tangone
P – Afferra il fiocco fuori dal tangone e cazza il fiocco ma non cazza il fiocco troppo velocemente (non più cazzato di quanto consente l’orzata della barca)
T – Quando c’è traffico, “slow & win”
T – Vai sul bordo in buono. Fai subito separazione, rimanendo in sintonia con il piano
P – Dopo il giro di boa, controlla la cima dello sparatangone all’estremità del boma e in coperta e controlla il punto scotta del fiocco su entrambi i lati

Poppa
T & P – Non dimenticare l’offset!
P – Stai avanti, a meno che non plani
P – Tangone più corto (a volte con vento leggero) o piena lunghezza?
T – Su nelle mollane e giù nelle raffiche; regola la ghinda (da 15 cm a 45) e il vang
P – Chiede al timoniere “Qual è il piano per la bolina?”
P – Tangone indietro quando scendi da un’onda
T – Non cazzare troppo vang; la stecca alta dovrebbe essere aperta
T – Scegli la boa del gate che si adatta al piano

Ultima bolina
T – Prendi il bordo in buono; fai subito separazione, rimanendo in sintonia con il piano
T & P – Controlla l’estremità favorevole della linea di arrivo (mai tagliare nel mezzo della linea; sempre attraversala ad angolo retto)

Timonare la barca con mezzi diversi dal timone
Movimenti del corpo
Spostarsi avanti – la barca va all’orza
Spostarsi indietro – la barca poggia
Torsione del busto in avanti – la barca poggia
Torsione del busto indietro – la barca orza
Sporgersi fuori – la barca poggia
Rientrare all’interno – la barca orza
Tensione della scotta
Randa cazzata – la barca orza
Randa lasca – la barca poggia
Fiocco cazzato – la barca poggia
Fiocco lasco – la barca orza
Deriva
Su – la barca poggia
Giù – la barca orza


Molti sanno chi è Peter Commette. Vincitore del mondiale Laser nel 1975, olimpionico per gli USA nella classe Finn (Kingston 1976), vincitore di molte regate in Snipe. Attualmente regata molto spesso in Snipe con sua figlia (così è stato all’ultimo Mondiale in Giappone), ottenendo frequenti vittorie e lusinghieri piazzamenti.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *