Some Thoughts on Starting and Going Fast Upwind in a Breeze and Chop

[caption id="attachment_4675" align="alignnone" width=""]www.friedbits.com/Midwinters 2006[/caption]

Originally published in the Snipe Bulletin, July 1993. Slightly modified by the Author, April 2006.

Regular readers of the Snipe Bulletin need no introduction to Peter Commette. He is one of the world’s best Snipe sailors and his record in other classes is even better, with a Laser World Title to his credit.

As the years go on, there seem to be fewer and fewer techniques which I utilize that my competitors don’t. Moreover, of those left-over techniques, there are fewer and fewer which I feel comfortable in believing give me a speed advantage.

However, there still are two points of sail concerning which I can offer some help to a few. These points of sail are: escaping the starting line and going fast upwind in a breeze and chop.

The key to sailing fast upwind in a breeze and chop is to keep the boat moving. This means that it is critically important to keep your lee bow
clear so that you can drive off when you need speed. From this first
philosophy of keeping your lee bow clear, comes a starting philosophy and a few starting techniques. I will not go into an in-depth discussion of starting, since most of you know that I am the king of OCS, and you know better than to listen to me.

www.friedbits.com/

Originally published in the Snipe Bulletin, July 1993. Slightly modified by the Author, April 2006.

Regular readers of the Snipe Bulletin need no introduction to Peter Commette. He is one of the world’s best Snipe sailors and his record in other classes is even better, with a Laser World Title to his credit.

As the years go on, there seem to be fewer and fewer techniques which I utilize that my competitors don’t. Moreover, of those left-over techniques, there are fewer and fewer which I feel comfortable in believing give me a speed advantage.

However, there still are two points of sail concerning which I can offer some help to a few. These points of sail are: escaping the starting line and going fast upwind in a breeze and chop.

The key to sailing fast upwind in a breeze and chop is to keep the boat moving. This means that it is critically important to keep your lee bow
clear so that you can drive off when you need speed. From this first
philosophy of keeping your lee bow clear, comes a starting philosophy and a few starting techniques. I will not go into an in-depth discussion of starting, since most of you know that I am the king of OCS, and you know better than to listen to me.

Nevertheless, one of the things that you must do in a chop in heavy air is start near someone whom you are faster than. If the better hole is to leeward of the person whom you are faster than, then take the hole, stuff yourself up as near as possible to him and concentrate on trimming in before the boat to leeward of you. If the better hole is to windward of the person whom you are faster than(I prefer this), concentrate totally on stuffing the person to windward of you and trimming in before the windward boat does. The key to trimming before
them is to listen for the sound of ratchets and watch body and eye movements.

The key to controlling the person to windward of you is to stop your boat dead, as near to him as possible, with your bow at least two feet in front of his. Don’t be afraid to push your boom out to stop your boat, and be careful of your mast coming to windward and hitting the boat to windward of you as he takes your air.

“How do you protect your hole?” some of you might ask. First of all, you want to take someone else’s. That means coming in late and setting up no earlier than one minute before the start (one and a half to two minutes in good international competition). Second, you must be alert. Watch for port tackers and boats going behind you that might want to take YOUR spot. Let them see early on that you will protect it. Make eye contact and let them know that you are watching them. When someone makes a movement for your hole, before he gets an overlap, bear off at right angles and place your boat across the hole. By placing your boat across the hole, you will either force the other skipper to look somewhere else for another hole, or when he is finally overlapped, you can get away from him by swinging your boat around through a wide arc and sailing straight upwind almost 180 degrees in the other direction back up to the boat to weather of you.

Once you start and you have your lee bow clear, start with the heavy air technique. First, it is important to point off the starting line. For that you need a straight jib stay. Sag in the headstay will hinder your pointing ability. Your cunninghams also should be loose for pointing until you are safe from the boats around you, but remember that you are going to have to hike extra hard with the loose cunninghams.

To keep your headstay straight it is absolutely imperative that your aft puller be on to the pre-bend position and your vang be set. However, if the vang is too tight, you will lose power in your mainsail. If it is too loose, the jibstay will sag when the mainsheet is eased. and your mainsail will luff up top. set the vang so there is no dprro in it when the boom is trimmed for the lightest air that you have been experiencing in the last five minutes.

While the vang is important, it’s the traveller that is the single most important key to heavy-air speed. The traveller should be kept directly underneath the boom when the boom is trimmed at its normal heavy air position. That way you will always be trimming down on your boom and thereby keep the jibstay straight. How far can you go with the traveller? I have let mine down as much as one and one half feet to keep the boat flat and the jibstay straight; at that point my jib was timmed out 20 inches (measured at right angles to the mast and marked on the splashrail).

In these conditions (chop), a correct technique for playing the waves is critical. You must look beyond your bow at all times to see the waves before you hit them. I am not a big proponent of steering up on the face of the wave and down on the back, or steering off on the face of the wave and up on the back. I save that for bigger seas in the ocean, if I bother with it at all.

I find that it is much better to look at waves as being presented to you in “blocks.” There are blocks of good waves that will not disturb your bow. There are blocks of bad waves that will disturb your bow, and there are flat spots. Each of these three conditions requires the bow of your boat to be positioned differently relative to the wind.

In the waves that disturb the bow of your boat, you have to bear off and ease the main and jib a little to get through them. I also heel my boat up a little bit, which I admit is of questionable value. Finally, the skipper and crew have to roll onto their aft thighs and lean back.

In the waves that will not severely knock my bow around I sail straight ahead on my normal course. In these waves I also keep the boat as flat as possible. Make sure you do not over-trim the jib. You need power in it and the leach free.

The waves which will not knock your bow around too much are also the key transitional waves. Not only do they allow you to bear off and get some good speed for the bad waves that are coming next, they also won’t hurt too much if you want to pinch up and get into a flat spot to windward. Flat spots are where you can really make tracks.

What I mean by saying that you can make tracks in the flat spots is that I view the flat spots as gifts. They are my free shots to windward. When I get into a flat spot I trim down extra hard on my main and pinch like crazy, sometimes carrying a little bit of a luff in the jib. Trim the jib a little tighter, too.

However, the key to a flat spot is not to be a pig. The boat cannot take this sort of pinching for too long, and, assuming that waves will be on the other side of the flat spot, you have to pull off in time to get speed before you get back into the waves.

Try the above and let me know the results. Good Luck! ! !

(da snipe.it, 13 aprile 2006)

Abbiamo chiesto a Peter Commette (nella foto – courtesy of Fried Elliot – al Midwinter di quest’anno da lui vinto) di poter pubblicare la traduzione di un articolo originariamente scritto per Snipe Bulletin del luglio 1993. Peter ci ha risposto dicendo che voleva apportare qualche piccola modifica all’articolo originale. Qui di seguito la traduzione della nuova versione dell’articolo per i lettori del nostro sito. Prossimamente potrete leggere la traduzione di un altro suo articolo. (Pietro Fantoni)

www.friedbits.com/

Molti sanno chi è Peter Commette. Vincitore del mondiale Laser nel 1975, olimpionico per gli USA nella classe Finn (Kingston 1976), vincitore di molte regate in Snipe. Attualmente regata molto spesso in Snipe con sua figlia (così è stato all’ultimo Mondiale in Giappone), ottenendo frequenti vittorie e lusinghieri piazzamenti.


di Peter Commette

Il nome da signorina di mia madre è Anita Maria Napoliello. Così quando mi è stato chiesto se avessi sostenuto la traduzione in Italiano di alcuni miei vecchi (molto vecchi) articoli, ovviamente ho acconsentito.

Sono cresciuto con mia nonna che viveva a casa con noi. Lei parlava molto poco l’Inglese. La chiamavo “Nonna” e sono cresciuto pensando che quello fosse il suo nome. Solo qualche anno più tardi ho iniziato a realizzare che tutte le nonne dei miei amici italiani sembrava si chiamassero con lo stesso nome! Per la cronaca ho finalmente capito che il vero nome della Nonna era Anita Belfi.

Spero che vi divertiate a leggere gli articoli che Pietro sta traducendo. Mi è stato chiesto perché non ho scritto più altri articoli dal 1992. Noi abbiamo un proverbio: “Non puoi insegnare ad un “old dog” nuovi trucchi.” Quello che ho scritto è tutto quello che allora conoscevo ed ancora è tutto ciò che conosco! Bau, bau! Buona lettura e buon divertimento.


Con il passare degli anni mi sembra che siano sempre meno le tecniche che io solo utilizzo e i miei avversari no. Inoltre, di quelle poche rimaste, ce ne sono ancora meno che ritengo mi diano un qualche vantaggio in termini di velocità. Tuttavia ci sono ancora un paio di punti sui quali posso offrire a qualcuno un aiuto. Questi punti sono: “scappare” dalla linea di partenza e andare veloci di bolina con vento e onda.

Il punto chiave del navigare veloci di bolina con vento forte e “chop” è tenere la barca in movimento. Ciò significa che è di cruciale importanza avere spazio a prua e sottovento cosicché potete poggiare quando avete bisogno di velocità. Da questa filosofia di tenere spazio libero a prua sottovento deriva la mia filosofia per le partenze, nonchè le relative tecniche. Non entrerò in una discussione approfondita sulle partenze, dal momento che molti di voi sanno che io sono il re degli OCS e, quindi, voi sapete di più di quanto vi possa raccontare.

Nondimeno, una delle cose che dovete fare in una partenza con onda e vento forte è partire vicino a qualcuno rispetto al quale sapete di essere più veloci. Se lo spazio migliore è sottovento a qualcuno di cui siete più veloci, allora prendete quel posto, infilatevi più vicini possibili a lui e concentratevi a cazzare le vele prima della barca sottovento a voi. Se il buco migliore è sopravento a qualcuno rispetto al quale siete più veloci (io preferisco questo caso), concentratevi totalmente a spingere la persona sopravento a voi e a cazzare le vele prima che lo faccia la barca sopravento. Il trucco per cazzare prima di loro è ascoltare il suono del cricco dei bozzelli e guardare i movimenti del corpo e degli occhi.

La chiave per controllare la persona sopravento a voi è fermare la vostra barca controvento, più vicina possibile a lui, con la vostra prua almeno 60 cm davanti a lui. Non abbiate paura a spingere il vostro boma fuori per arrestare la barca, ma fate attenzione che il vostro albero non sbandi sopravento e tocchi la barca al vento quando questa porta via la vostra aria.

“Come proteggere lo spazio?” qualcuno di voi potrebbe chiedere. In primo luogo, dovete e volete sottrarlo a qualcun altro. Ciò significa entrare tardi e posizionarsi non prima di un minuto prima della partenza (un minuto e mezzo – due minuti in una regata di buon livello internazionale). Secondo, dovete stare all’erta. Osservate le barche che arrivano mura a sinistra e quelle che arrivano da dietro che potrebbero voler prendere il VOSTRO spazio. Fategli capire da subito che intendete proteggerlo. Quando qualcuno fa una manovra interessata a prendere il vostro spazio, prima che si ingaggi, poggiate e mettete la barca di traverso nello spazio. Piazzando la barca di traverso o forzerete l’altro timoniere a cercare da qualche altra parte per un buco, o, quando è ingaggiato, potrete allontanarvi da lui facendo descrivere alla vostra barca un ampio arco e navigando dritto al vento, quasi a 180 gradi, nella direzione opposta, di nuovo verso la barca sopravento a voi.

Una volta che partite e che avete spazio libero sottovento, cominciate a pensare alla conduzione con vento forte. Primo, è importante orzare fuori dalla linea di partenza, Per questo avete bisogno di un ingresso del fiocco dritto. La catenaria del fiocco ostacola la capacità di orzare. Anche il cunningham deve essere lasco finché non siete sicuri della posizione delle barche attorno a voi, ma ricordate che dovete cinghiare con cattiveria con i cunningham lasco.

Per avere l’ingresso del fiocco dritto è assolutamente imperativo che la leva sia sulla posizione neutra del pre-bend (non più avanti) e che il vang sia cazzato. Comunque, se il vang è troppo cazzato, perderete potenza nella randa. Se invece è troppo lasco, ci sarà catenaria quando la scotta della randa sarà lascata e la randa sventerà in alto. Regola il vang così che non ci sia catenaria quando il boma è regolato per l’aria più leggera che avete trovato negli ultimi cinque minuti.

Se il vang è importante, l’archetto è la singola regolazione più importante per la velocità con vento forte. L’archetto (la congiungente delle due briglie in cui si divide la scotta della randa) dovrebbe essere tenuto direttamente sotto il boma quando il boma è cazzato nella sua normale posizione con vento forte. In questo modo cazzerete verso il basso il boma e perciò terrete l’ingresso del fiocco dritto senza catenaria. Quanto fuori potete andare con l’archetto? Io ho lascato sottovento il mio fino a 45 cm per tenere la barca piatta e il fiocco dritto; a quel punto il mio fiocco è regolato verso l’esterno 50 cm (misurati perpendicolarmente all’albero e contrassegnati sul paraspruzzi).

In queste condizioni (chop), una corretta tecnica per affrontare le onde è cruciale. Dovete guardare oltre la vostra prua sempre per vedere le onde prima di colpirle. Non sono un grande fautore della tecnica dell’orzare sulla faccia dell’onda e poggiare sul retro, o del poggiare sulla faccia e orzare sul retro. Utilizzo quella tecnica con mare più grosso in oceano, se proprio lo devo fare.

Trovo che è molto meglio pensare alle onde come ci si presentano in “blocchi”. Ci sono blocchi di buone onde che non disturberanno la vostra prua. Ci sono blocchi di onde cattive che disturberanno la vostra prua e ci saranno spazzi di acqua piatta. Ciascuna di queste condizioni richiede che la prua della vostra barca sia posizionata differentemente in relazione al vento.

Colle onde che disturbano la prua della vostra barca, dovete poggiare e lascare un po’ di randa e fiocco per passarle. Io anche sbando un pochino la barca, il che ammetto è un punto discutibile. Infine, timoniere e prodiere devono appoggiarsi sulla loro coscia più a poppa e piegarsi all’indietro.

Colle onde che non colpiscono severamente contro la mia prua, navigo dritto sulla mia normale rotta. Con queste onde anche porto la barca più piatta possibile. Fate attenzione a non avere il fiocco troppo cazzato. Avete bisogno di potenza e che la balumina sia aperta.

Le onde che non picchiano troppo contro la vostra prua sono anche le onde di transizione. Non solo esse consentono di poggiare  e acquisire un po’ di buona velocità per le onde cattive che stanno per arrivare, ma anche non vi danneggiano troppo se volete orzare e entrare in una zona di acqua piatta sopravento. Le zone di acqua piatta sono dove voi potete veramente fare le “traiettorie”.

Ciò che intendo dire quando dico che potete fare le traiettorie in zone d’acqua piatta è che vedo queste zone come dei regali. Sono il mio pezzo forte. Quando entro in una zona d’acqua piatta cazzo per bene la scotta e sticco come un pazzo, qualche volta sventando un pochino il fiocco. Io cazzo anche il fiocco un po’ di più.

Tuttavia l’aspetto importante quando siete in una zona d’acqua piatta è non essere ingordi. La barca non può proseguire sticcata troppo a lungo e, sapendo che le onde vi aspettano alla fine della zona d’acqua piatta, dovrete poggiare in tempo per riprendere velocità prima che finiate nuovamente dentro le onde.

Provate quanto vi ho detto e fatemi sapere i risultati. In bocca al lupo!!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *