How to Improve Fast – 2. How to Prepare the Boat

By Luis Soubie

In the previous chapter, the first, we discussed the critical importance of THINKING all the time while racing. Only if we think will we have ideas, and some of them will lead us to success, or at least we will finish better than usual.

This thinking about the race also WORKs when we are NOT racing. Previous work is essential and the next 3 chapters talk about this.

Try to see this sport as a game of probabilities. There are several factors and you make decisions all the time and they will be better or worse depending on how much information you have, whether you analyzed well or not, whether you executed well or badly. Luck does not exist and NOBODY does EVERYTHING well. Prepare the boat well to maximize the probabilities.

So this game is to put as many odds in our favor as possible. Each factor involved, from the tactical, speed, mental, comfort, boat, even whether we are hungry or thirsty, we must do everything possible to help ourselves win. Meanwhile, others will stop working on it and will not have this, giving us an advantage for FREE.

By Luis Soubie

In the previous chapter, the first, we discussed the critical importance of THINKING all the time while racing. Only if we think will we have ideas, and some of them will lead us to success, or at least we will finish better than usual.

This thinking about the race also WORKs when we are NOT racing. Previous work is essential and the next 3 chapters talk about this.

Try to see this sport as a game of probabilities. There are several factors and you make decisions all the time and they will be better or worse depending on how much information you have, whether you analyzed well or not, whether you executed well or badly. Luck does not exist and NOBODY does EVERYTHING well. Prepare the boat well to maximize the probabilities.

So this game is to put as many odds in our favor as possible. Each factor involved, from the tactical, speed, mental, comfort, boat, even whether we are hungry or thirsty, we must do everything possible to help ourselves win. Meanwhile, others will stop working on it and will not have this, giving us an advantage for FREE.

One of the most important aspects is the boat. And I do not mean the set-up (we’ll talk about this later), but the condition of the boat, which often leaves much to be desired. Every week many people approach me and ask about the rake and tension, and I go by their boat and see that everything is dirty, the rudder and centerboard scratched, ropes and shackles in many cases precarious, failed systems, halyards nor working well, etc. Until we eliminate this long list of things that are wrong, the setup does not matter.

It also happens that people come to congratulate me on Sunday afternoon if we won, and they point out that “we always win or do so good” and they suggest there is a kind of “magical talent”, a status quo that is impossible to beat. They never see the work behind the success, they do not observe that Saturday morning we are the first ones to the club, one of the few to wash the hull. We never stop working on the boat while the others talk at the dock, and we are the first out on the water to test the day. They do not know that if something got stuck last week, surely we have dedicated a whole afternoon to fixing it during the week. The attitude of saying “he will allways win” is an easy way to look at it, one that I do not agree with at all. There is talent, sure, sometimes more and sometimes less, but not a single “winner” in our sport is not working like crazy to achieve their success.

As a rule, those who are beginning or who are unable to always be among the top shuold start by copying the winners. Do not try to invent what is already invented. It is not the time. Wait until you have 10 years in the class or you are already a top sailor.
One of the most common mistakes I see is that the more basic the level of a sailor, the more complicated the systems that are implemented on the boat, as if a system to put the boom 3cm to windward will make you win races tomorrow. Ridiculous. Why worry about this while there are other things that do not work at all?

67600 10151121040152397 31015356 nThe hull must be smooth and clean. You must work on the bottom and wash with detergent every week. Sand it or polish if necessary. Personally, I give an additional deeper cleaning and I apply Teflon once a month or at every major regatta. On salt water (I sail in fresh water), washing the hull is a daily task.

Take on the job of fixing everything, and make sure everything works fine. The rudder should not have any movement at the pintles or the extension. And its surface must be perfect. The centerboard should have velcro or something to prevent it from moving in the daggerboard case.

The centerboard is the most important element of the boat. Everyone sandpapers occasionally, but very few give good shape to the leading edge or exit (the mos important is the exit). 99% of the shapes that come from the factory are not very good, at best, and people use the board that way until they sell the boat. Another issue that strikes me when I travel is that almost nobody has the anodized centerboard. I sail in fresh water and I have it anodized and only polish it the same amount as the hull. Anodized aluminum is much harder than the raw aluminum. So anodize!

Keep the boat SIMPLE! 2 sheets, vang, pre bend fore and aft, cunningham and that is all. Do not get more complicated (traveler, barber haulers, ropes to open the bailer, and other systems). That’s for later. You use them very few times at the beginning, and they will be misused. Keep the weight to a minimum.

All the lines have to run well, be as thin as possible, of good quality and not excessively long. The mainsheet should be máximum diameter of 10mm (I use 7mm) and the jib 8mm (I use 6mm). The maximum line for pole 6mm (I use 5mm). The thinner the rope, the better it runs and less weight when wet. If something gets stuck ONCE it is because it is NOT well put together. In a well-rigged Snipe, ropes work properly all the time.

Buy sails that are EASY to sail with. Radial sails are faster but require an intense trim, and if you do not do it, they become slower. At the beginning of the year when I’m “out of shape” I race with cross cut sails, and I step into the radial halfway through the year when I feel I’m sailing in top form.

Be sure to start the race with a dry boat. Do not carry anything that holds wáter: clothing, food or tools. Do not dress in big clothes. Try to wear lycra and a spray top. I sail barefoot if it is not too windy, for more sensitivity—and I don´t carry useless weight in boots. Wetsuits, loose clothing, shorts over other garments or cotton shorts are very fashionable but they are not the best. Remember, neoprene boots and hiking pants of helmsman and crew together weigh 15 kilos when wet. That is pure ballast.

Eat an energy bar between races and take plenty of water, but never fill the bottles. Do not eat lunch! You can not race well while digesting your food. You have a limited amount of blood and will need it in the legs and the brain, not in the digestive system. Urinate rather tan racing for an hour thinking of the bathroom at the club.

Remember, THINK about everything we can do to get in better condition at the start, to have a faster boat. All this is free and requires relatively little effort. Undoubtedly much less effort than is required to tactically get the same advantage.

In the next chapter we will discuss the set-up.

484146 303285913114667 318248602 n

“HOW TO IMPROVE FAST” is a series of short articles to the sailors who usually end up outside the first third of the fleet in most races.
They are sailors who week after week try to improve, try to repeat what they did in that race in which they finished better. They try to stay in front when they round the first mark near the leaders, but most of the time they fall back without knowing why..

The goal of all this is to provide some technical elements to help them stop committing some recurring errors immediately, so they can see results right away.

Of course, and this needs to be said, this is just my humble PERSONAL opinion, and others will have an equally valid different one. This is what I’ve learned or observed in the 35 years I’ve been racing sailboats, 26 of them under the “fat bird”, and what I try to do or avoid every weekend.

1 HOW TO RACE

COMO MEJORAR RAPIDO

PROLOGO

“COMO MEJORAR RÁPIDO” es una serie de artículos cortos dirigidos a los regatistas que normalmente terminan fuera del primer tercio de la flota en la mayoría de las regatas.

Son regatistas que semana tras semana tratan de mejorar, tratan de repetir lo que hicieron en aquella regata en la que terminaron más adelante. Tratan de mantenerse en punta esos días en los que viran la primer boya cerca de los punteros pero la mayoría de las veces no lo consiguen sin saber porqué.

El objetivo es poder brindar algunos elementos técnicos que los ayude a dejar de cometer algunos errores recurrentes de manera inmediata, para que puedan ver resultados enseguida.

Por supuesto, y es necesario aclararlo, esto no es más que mi humilde opinión PERSONAL, otros tendrán otra igualmente valida. Esto es lo que yo he aprendido o he observado en los 35 años que llevo corriendo regatas, 26 de ellos bajo el pajarito, y lo que trato de hacer o evitar cada fin de semana.

2 COMO PREPARAR EL BARCO

En el capítulo anterior, el primero, les hable sobre la importancia fundamental de PENSAR todo el tiempo mientras corremos regatas. Solo pensando tendremos ideas, y algunas de ellas nos llevarán al éxito, o en el peor de los casos a salir mejor que lo habitual.

Esto de pensar en la regata se traslada a TRABAJAR cuando NO estamos en regata. El trabajo previo es fundamental y los próximos 3 capítulos hablarán de esto.

Traten de ver este deporte como un juego de probabilidades. Hay diversos factores y ustedes tomarán decisiones todo el tiempo y estas serán mejores o peores en función de cuánta información tengan, de si la analizan bien o mal, de si la ejecutan bien o mal. La suerte no existe y NADIE hace TODO bien. Preparar el barco bien, es maximizar las probabilidades de este factor, a favor de nosotros.

Por eso este juego se trata de poner la mayor cantidad de probabilidades a nuestro favor. Cada factor que interviene, desde lo táctico, la velocidad, lo mental, el confort, el barco, si tenemos hambre o sed, todo debemos ponerlo en el mejor estado de probabilidades posible para que nos ayude, mientras que otros dejarán de trabajar en ello y lo tendrán en contra, dándonos una ventaja GRATIS.

Uno de los aspectos más importantes para trabajar es nuestra herramienta. El barco. Y no me refiero a la puesta a punto, de eso ya hablaremos, sino al estado del barco, que muchas veces deja mucho que desear. Yo observo semana tras semana que mucha gente se me acerca y me pregunta la caída del palo y la tensión, y los ayudo con su barco y veo que está todo sucio, el timón y la orza rayados, los cabos y grilletes en muchos casos son precarios, sistemas que no funcionan, la driza fila mal, etc. Hasta no eliminar esta larga lista de cosas que están mal, la puesta a punto no tiene sentido.

También vienen quizás a felicitarme el Domingo a la tarde si ganamos, y remarcan que les ganamos siempre y que uno tiene una especie de “talento mágico” que es imposible de vencer, pero nunca observan el trabajo detrás del éxito, no observan que el Sábado a la mañana fuimos los primeros en llegar al club, uno de los pocos que lavamos el fondo y nunca paramos de trabajar en el barco mientras los demás conversaban, los primeros en salir al agua a probar. No saben que si algo se trabó la semana pasada, con toda seguridad hemos dedicado una tarde entera a arreglarlo durante la semana. La actitud de decir “ese gana porque es mejor” es un facilismo que no comparto en absoluto. Existe el talento, claro, pero no hay un solo “ganador” en el yachting que no trabaje como loco detrás de su éxito.

Como regla general, a quienes están empezando o quienes no logran estar siempre entre los primeros, les quiero remarcar la importancia de COPIAR. No se pongan a inventar lo que ya está inventado. No es el momento. Inventen cuando tengan 10 años en la clase o salgan siempre en punta.

Uno de los errores más comunes que veo es que cuanto más básico es el nivel de un regatista, más sistemas raros quiere implementar en el barco, como si un sistema para poner la botavara 3cm a barlovento lo hiciera orzar tanto como para hacerlo ganar regatas mañana mismo. Ridículo. Se preocupan por esto, y mientras hay otras cosas que no funcionan en absoluto.

El casco del barco debe estar liso y limpio. Hay que tomarse el trabajo y lavar el fondo con detergente todas la semanas. Masillarlo si hace falta o pulirlo. En lo personal, yo le doy una lavada adicional más profunda y le aplico Teflon una vez al mes o en cada campeonato importante. Si es agua salada (yo navego en agua dulce), esto de lavar el casco es tarea diaria.

Tómense el trabajo de arreglar todo, y que todo funcione bien. El timón no debe tener juego ni en los herrajes, ni en la caña. Y su superficie debe estar perfecta. La orza debe tener velcro o algo que impida que se mueva en la caja de orza.

La orza es el elemento más importante del barco. Todo el mundo la lija de vez en cuando, pero nadie la masilla o la cuida, muy pocos le dan buena forma al borde de ataque o de salida (es mucho más importante la salida). El 99% de las formas que vienen de fábrica son mediocres, como mucho, y la gente la usa de ese modo hasta que venden el barco. Otro tema que me sorprende es que cuando viajo a correr en el mar veo que casi nadie tiene la orza anodizada. Obviamente, a veces ni la lijan. Yo navego en agua dulce y la tengo anodizada y solo debo pulirla como el casco. El anodizado es mucho más duro que el aluminio crudo. Asi que anodizen !

Tengan el barco SIMPLE ! 2 escotas, vang, pre bend y apopa palo, 2 cunninghams y listo. No se compliquen con traveler, barbers, cabos para abrir el bayler y otros sistemas. Eso es para después. Ahora lo van a usar poco y lo van a usar mal. Tengan el peso en el mínimo.

TODOS los cabos deben correr bien, ser lo más finos posibles, de calidad y no deben ser largos en exceso. La escota de mayor 10mm máximo (yo uso 7) y la de foque 8mm máximo (yo uso 6mm). El cabo de tangón 6mm máximo (yo uso 5mm). Cuanto más fino es un cabo, mejor corre y menos pesa al mojarse. Si algo se traba UNA vez es porque NO está bien armado. En el snipe los cabos bien armados no se traban nunca.Compren velas FACIL de navegar. Las velas radiales son más rápidas pero demandan un trimado intensísimo, que si no lo hacen, resultarán más lentas. Yo en lo personal, al principio del año cuando estoy “fuera de forma” navego con velas cross cut, y me paso a radial hacia mitad del año cuando siento que estoy navegando en plena forma.
Asegúrense de largar la regata con el barco seco. No lleven ropa en los estancos, ni comida ni herramientas. Solo un poco de agua. No se vistan aparatosamente. Traten de usar lycras y un spray top. Para mi, navegar descalzo si no sopla mucho es una gran cosa, me da mas sensibilidad y es peso ahí abajo que no sirve para nada. Los trajes de agua, la ropa suelta, los short sobre otras prendas o los shorts de algodón son muy a la moda pero no son lo mejor. Recuerden, las botas de neoprene y los hicking pants empapados de timonel y tripulante pesan 15 kilos …. Eso es lastre puro.

Coman una barra energizante entre regata y regata y tomen abundante agua, pero nunca se llenen. No almuercen ! No pueden correr haciendo una gran digestión. Tienen una cantidad limitada de sangre y la van a necesitar en las piernas y el cerebro, no en el sistema digestivo. Hagan sus necesidades, no corran pensando una hora en ir al baño cuando lleguen al club.

Recuerden, PIENSEN en cada cosa que puedan hacer para estar en mejor condición en el momento de la largada, para tener un barco más rápido. Todo esto es ventaja pura, gratis, con relativo poco esfuerzo. Sin dudas mucho menos esfuerzo que lo que se requiere tácticamente para obtener la misma ventaja.

Cada día que corro una regata tengo todo esto al 100% y considero que esto me entrega unas 2 esloras de ventaja como mínimo, lo cuál no parece mucho, pero imaginen si ustedes pudieran largar 2 esloras sobre la línea.

En el próximo capitulo hablaremos de la puesta a punto.

2 thoughts on “How to Improve Fast – 2. How to Prepare the Boat

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *