2017-2020 Racing Rules of Sailing

The Racing Rules of Sailing 2017-2020 – Effective 1 January 2017

2017-2020 RRS Changes and Corrections

2017-2020 World Sailing Racing Rules of Sailing

(Photo courtesy of Maria Muina)

From Sailing Scuttlebutt

The following list is a quick overview of the significant changes in the 2017-2020 edition of The Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS). These are changes from the 2013-2016 edition, and are excerpted from from Dave Perry’s Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2020.

These brief summaries are not intended to be actual representations of the rules; nor is this a complete list of all the changes in the 2017-2020 RRS. In the USA, the new rules are free for US Sailing members or can be bought here.

The Racing Rules of Sailing 2017-2020 – Effective 1 January 2017

2017-2020 RRS Changes and Corrections

2017-2020 World Sailing Racing Rules of Sailing

(Photo courtesy of Maria Muina)

From Sailing Scuttlebutt

The following list is a quick overview of the significant changes in the 2017-2020 edition of The Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS). These are changes from the 2013-2016 edition, and are excerpted from from Dave Perry’s Understanding the Racing Rules of Sailing through 2020.

These brief summaries are not intended to be actual representations of the rules; nor is this a complete list of all the changes in the 2017-2020 RRS. In the USA, the new rules are free for US Sailing members or can be bought here.

Conflict of Interest This new definition takes the place of the previous definition “Interested Party.” The new definition is broader in that it includes the perception that a person may have a personal or financial interest that could affect their ability to be impartial. This new definition is the cornerstone of the revised rule 63.4 (Conflict of Interest).

Party This definition has been expanded to include the new “technical committee” (see new rule 92, Technical Committee) which can protest under rule 60.4 (Right to Protest; Right to Request Redress or Rule 69 Action), a person presenting an allegation under rule 69 (Misconduct), and the new “support person” when they are subject to a hearing under new rule 60.3(d).

Support Person This new definition is part of the significant change that has brought people who support competitors under the jurisdiction of the racing rules, and makes them and the competitors they support liable for penalty if they do not comply with the rules or if they act in a way that is considered “misconduct.” See in particular rule 3 (Acceptance of the Rules), rule 60.3(d) (Right to Protest; Right to Request Redress or Rule 69 Action), rule 64.4 (Decisions Concerning Support Persons) and rule 69.1(a) (Obligation not to Commit Misconduct; Resolution). The definition includes, among others, parents and coaches.

Rule 2 (Fair Sailing) This has been changed such that the penalty for breaking it can now be either disqualification (DSQ) or DSQ that is not excludable (DNE). This may result in the rule being applied in more circumstances than before when the only option for penalty was DNE.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *